Three Tips for Making Small Spaces Work for Your Family

Small spaces aren’t the traditionally sought–after spaces for growing families, but with more millennial parents choosing to live a minimal lifestyle — families are adapting to life in homes with less square footage. If your family is downsizing by choice, or by necessity, follow the tips below for creating a functional space that can support your growing family.

Channel Your Inner Marie Kondo

It’s time to purge! Take a tip from tiny home enthusiasts who have chosen to live a simpler life — downsizing means committing to decluttering. Re–gift, donate and sell unwanted items. Eliminate multiples and only keep items that spark joy — and have your kids help.

Every Item Has a Home, Every Space a Purpose

Being thoughtful about what items stay in your family’s space is just as important as figuring out where to store it. Families without the space for a designated playroom may want to consider where toys will be tucked away. Try rotating toys to save space, while helping kids get the most out of playtime.

Go Vertical

Some may say that floor space is the most valued space in a smaller home — but vertical is the way to go! Bookcases, coat racks and shoe trees are all great options for tiny spaces.

Looking for a new home, or know someone else who is? Contact me; I’ll be happy to help!

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A Successful Move Is All in the Details

Nearly 35.5 million Americans move each year, according to data from Move.org. With so much to think about, from organizing and packing to lifting and moving heavy boxes, it’s easy to forget the little things that can make life a little easier during a move. Here are some small details that may get overlooked – tips to make any move smoother and stress free.

Unplug Carefully
Don’t just pull the plug on expensive electronics and toss them in a box – a little planning will help you protect expensive gadgets, like TVs, laptops and stereo systems. Think before dismounting that big, flat-screen TV by yourself. Follow this guide to make sure nothing is damaged. Place all user manuals in a folder so they don’t get lost in the shuffle, but don’t panic if you’ve misplaced them because you can usually find manuals on manufacturers’ websites. Consider a professional mover for your more delicate electronics. Atlas Van Lines suggests using a qualified professional to uninstall any wall-mounted AV equipment and to call in advance to schedule an appointment so you’re not scrambling at the last minute.

Food for Thought
Don’t forget about dinner – you still need to eat during a move. Packing up the kitchen is usually the last, most challenging part of the moving process, but if you make plans you won’t go hungry.

  • Donate: Think about donating canned or unopened food to your local food bank. This leaves one less thing to pack and supports your community.
  • Meal Plan: Use the foods still left in your fridge and freezer for meal planning. Take inventory of the foods you have available leading up to the big day. Home Cooking Memories has some tasty ideas.
  • Label and Organize: Don’t pack up those cooking utensils just yet. Label your moving boxes to easily access the kitchen gadgets you still need to whip up a quick dinner. Consider the packing order of appliances you won’t need, like the blender, and place everyday items, like spatulas, on top for easy access.

The Essentials
You’ve unloaded the last box and you’re ready to shower, eat and relax – only to remember that your toiletries are buried in a dozen boxes, spread across the house. Avoid this all-too-common mistake by packing one or two “essentials boxes” that contain extra clothing, towels, toiletries, medications, bedding and phone chargers that will last up to three or four days.

Know Your Limits
It may be tempting to save money by doing the moving yourself, but don’t get in over your head. Know your limits, suggests OZ Moving and Storage, “If you’re not sure if you can accomplish some part of your move without professional help, don’t try. We were called up once by a trio of college students who had gotten their couch stuck in a staircase. Getting in over your head and having to call emergency help is not ideal.” Get quotes from a few moving companies to determine what needs to be moved or packed by a professional.

A successful move is all in the details – but, with a plan in place you won’t forget the small stuff!

Moving with pets? How to ease their anxiety on moving day

Moving comes with many emotions for both you and your pets – from the excitement of a new city, new house, or both, to sadness for leaving a place you’ve called home. Moving is emotional for many reasons, and your pets pick up on how you feel. Here are some tips to keep your pets comfortable and confident during the moving process, and ultimately make it easier for you, your pets and your family.

Don’t Forget to Breathe

It’s important to take care of yourself during your move. Pets pick up on their family’s energy and can sense if you’re upset, frustrated or anxious. If you feel yourself getting overwhelmed, make sure to take a breath and relax, because your pets will do the same!

Safety First!

The worst thing that can happen during a move is realizing that your pet has slipped out unnoticed in all the commotion. With you and helpers coming in and out of the house, and all of the noise associated with moving, pets can easily become distressed.

To allow yourself to concentrate on moving and to keep your pet safe and secure, perhaps the best option is to have a family member or friend take your pet to their house during move-out day. If there isn’t someone close by that can pet sit for the day, consider doggie daycares and boarding facilities.

If neither of those options will work for you, consider giving your pets their own space in the house, and closing the door with a “Do Not Enter” sign, especially if you have movers helping you. If you can’t designate a room, consider a crate to keep your pets safely out of the way and unable to escape when you aren’t looking.

A Busy Pet is a Happy Pet

Do your best to keep your pets busy and help them forget all of the hubbub going on around them. Consider turning on a TV or radio, giving them toys to play with, or propping them up near windows to look outside.

Keep Up Their Routine

Pets thrive when routines are maintained, so it’s important to keep feeding and walking times the same during your move. This gives some normalcy to an otherwise anything-but-normal situation. Signaling to your pets that what they have come to count on won’t change is a great way to keep them feeling confident and comfortable.

4 Tips to Help Kids Adjust to a new School After a Move

At any age, a move can be stressful. But for school-age kids, a major move means changing schools, adjusting to new curriculum and finding new friends. Here are a few things you can do to help ease the transition and encourage kids during a school transfer.

Acknowledge their anxiety.

The first day of school is always knee-knocking and nerve-racking. The first day at a new school can be even scarier for kids. Let them know that their feelings are completely natural and understandable. Affirm their feelings, and then offer advice or personal anecdotes about times you have been nervous about a situation that turned-out O.K.

Take a trial run.

If the new school doesn’t host an official orientation for new students, try to request a tour for you and your child. Younger kids can be comforted by seeing their classroom and playground, and learning the location of the bathroom and the bus port. Older kids may like to walk their first day’s schedule: from the bus, to the locker, to their different classrooms.

Meet the neighbors

Meeting your neighbors and parents at your new school can be a great help for your kids. You can hear first-hand how families have navigated the school district, and even arrange play dates or meet-ups between your kids and other students. Start making connections as a classroom volunteer, or mingling at the bus stop to chat to other parents.

Pack a special lunch.

If your kids bring lunch, make it a special one filled with their favorite snacks and an encouraging note from you.

Thinking about moving to a neighborhood with a better school district? I’ll be happy to help; contact me today!